Learning Center

Driving on Company Business

Drive business success through safe drivers.

If the success of your business depends on drivers, make sure you’re only sending responsible motorists out on the road.

Begin by reviewing an individual’s driving record. Motor Vehicle Records (MVRs) are kept on file in every state where an individual holds a driver’s license. These records show whether a license has been suspended or revoked, list the driver’s involvement in accidents, and cite convictions for traffic violations and related laws.

Businesses operating a fleet of vehicles can usually obtain MVRs through appropriate state agencies, their insurance agent or their insurance company. To do so, they must provide the driver’s name, date of birth, address and driver’s license number.

Evaluating MVRs should be a cornerstone of your organization’s new driver selection procedure. In evaluating driver records, keep in mind:

  • The frequency of accident or traffic convictions is more significant than the severity of these incidents.

  • Recent history of accidents or convictions is more significant than older history.

Screen new drivers

Consider developing guidelines that use MVRs in screening new drivers. For example, guidelines that might disqualify an employee from a significant driving position could include:

  • A driving while intoxicated conviction within the last three years.

  • Three serious violations during the past three years (i.e., exceeding the speed limit by 15 or more miles per hour, following too closely, reckless driving and moving violations in connection with a fatal traffic accident).

  • Two accidents or a combination of one accident and two violations in the last three years.

  • License suspension or revocation due to traffic violations in the last three years.

Monitor existing drivers

Periodic MVR monitoring of existing drivers is also advisable. Record reviews are normally conducted subsequent to an accident and annually for all existing drivers. Problems detected in a driving record review should be used to initiate personal counseling, remedial training, or reassignment to non-driving positions.

Why the data matters

A history of accidents and traffic violations reflects driving attitudes and habits, and can be indicative of a driver’s future accident experience.

Consider these results from a recent study by the California Department of Motor Vehicles:

  • A driver with one accident is 2 times as likely to have a future accident.

  • A driver with two accidents is 2.3 times as likely to have a future accident.

  • A driver with three accidents is 3.2 times as likely to have a future accident.

  • A driver with four accidents is 4 times as likely to have a future accident.

The study also concludes that drivers with traffic violations in the past three years will have more future accidents than drivers with good records.

  • A driver with one conviction is 1.7 times as likely to have a future accident.

  • A driver with two convictions is 2.2 times as likely to have a future accident.

  • A driver with three convictions is 2.6 times as likely to have a future accident.

  • A driver with four convictions is 3.1 times as likely to have a future accident.


The recommendations printed here follow generally accepted safety standards. Compliance with these recommendations does not guarantee that you will be in conformance with any building code, or federal, state or local regulations regarding safety or fire. Compliance does not ensure the absolute safety of you, your operations or place of business.

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