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Today’s Best Work-From-Home Jobs

Updated November 2, 2019 . AmFam Team

Learn more about today’s top remote job opportunities, including salary ranges and the skills needed to be a work-from-home success!

Staying in your PJs, sipping a latté, avoiding the rush-hour commute — these are just a few perks of working from home in your own inspired space. If this kind of flexibility sounds appealing, but you still want the stability of a traditional job, you’re in luck! Many employers are now embracing flexible work environments to keep their workers happy, healthy and productive.

Keep reading for an in-depth list of remote job opportunities, complete with salary ranges and tips for how to get started!

The Top 10 Work-From-Home Jobs

We've compiled a variety of work-from-home jobs — from entry-level positions, to the best jobs for parents, to the highest-paying opportunities. They represent a wide range of industries and salaries and reflect current trends and areas in which rapid growth is expected over the next several years.* Take a look and explore your options!

  1. Bookkeeper
  2. Average annual salary: $38,000

    Bookkeepers help businesses keep financial records in order by preparing invoices, recording payments and balancing the general ledger. Since most bookkeepers use accounting software to maintain records and help prepare compliance filings such as tax returns and W-2s, it’s a job that can easily be done from home.

    How to get started. You might be surprised to learn you don’t have to be a certified public accountant to do this job — you may not even need a college degree. Bookkeepers need a keen eye for detail, a high level of organization and solid math skills. You can seek out bookkeeping courses at your local community college or online to get started.

  3. Customer Service Representative
  4. Average annual salary: $33,000

    Ever wonder where that customer service rep you’re talking to lives? They could be anywhere. Many businesses have virtual call centers where representatives answer calls from their homes rather than an office. This allows employers the flexibility to staff up during peak seasons (like holiday shopping) and gives you the chance to work from home, often on your own schedule.

    How to get started. Check online job boards for virtual customer service representative opportunities. You’ll need a quiet place to work (so callers can’t hear barking dogs or giggling kids), a dedicated phone line, a computer with internet service — and a great attitude!

  5. Freelance Writer
  6. Average annual salary: $62,000

    Freelance writing can be a versatile profession that’s perfect for working from home. Writers are paid to create content for advertising, magazines, websites, social media posts, blogs and more. The best part? You can typically set your own hours (as long as you meet your clients’ deadlines).

    How to get started. Most writers have at least a bachelor’s degree in a related field. You’ll need to build a solid portfolio of work to attract clients. Search online for credible freelance writing networks that fit your experience, or volunteer to write for a local charitable organization. Then, start advertising your services with a website and on social media.

  7. Graphic Designer
  8. Average annual salary: $45,000

    Graphic designers help businesses present their image to the world. They create designs for websites, logos, brochures, advertisements and more. Graphic designers have an eye for the artistic, and the ability to translate ideas into visuals based on what their clients need.

    How to get started. Graphic designers need to work well with clients and be skilled in various graphic design programs. Most designers have a college degree or certification in graphic design and experience with an advertising agency or corporate marketing department.

  9. Online Teacher
  10. Average annual salary: $40,000

    The internet enables students to learn from anywhere. Online public schools are booming and offer K-12 students access to state-certified teachers who connect with them through email, live chats, and video or audio lectures supplemented with downloadable materials. Many colleges also offer online learning programs and even fully virtual degrees, so there’s high demand for educators who can provide instruction online.

    How to get started. You’ll need a college education and a teaching license to be an online teacher. College instructors have the potential for much higher earnings, but you’ll need to have a master’s degree at the very minimum.

  11. Social Media Manager
  12. Average annual salary: $54,000

    Businesses today need a solid social media presence — both to build a positive brand presence and to reach customers. Social media managers guide communication strategy on Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other platforms. Since social media is “always on,” you may need to respond to a crisis in the wee hours of the morning, so keep that in mind.

    How to get started. You’ll need more than an Instagram following to be successful in this role. Social media managers typically have a college degree, knowledge of data analytics tools and excellent communication skills. Build a track record with a marketing agency or corporate communications department before you go freelance.

  13. Translator
  14. Average annual salary: $60,000

    Companies wanting to reach customers around the world need to communicate in their languages and depend on translators for help. In-demand translators are fluent in at least two languages, have a good grasp of a language’s grammar and cultural nuances, can translate quickly and accurately, and are comfortable working with written documents. Translators can often set their own hours, so translating makes a great stay-at-home job.

    How to get started. You’ll need to be fluent in at least two languages (like Spanish and English) and have excellent writing skills. Most translators are also college educated.

  15. Travel Agent
  16. Average annual salary: $36,000

    Travel agents often work from home because the internet has made it easier than ever to connect with potential clients. Experienced travel agents help travelers save time and money (and avoid the stress of choosing flights and hotels). Since the number of hours you put in depends on your goals, it can be a good entrepreneurial opportunity for anyone who wants to work from home part-time.

    How to get started. You’ll need a solid business plan to achieve your goals as a travel agent. Set your working hours, create a business website and research your state’s licensing requirements. You don’t need a college education, but you may need specialized training.

  17. Virtual Assistant
  18. Average annual salary: $39,000

    Virtual assistants act as off-site secretaries to their business clients. They work from home to manage emails, arrange meetings, help with event management, and assist with social media. They provide essential services to businesses to help keep things running smoothly.

    How to get started. It helps to have experience as an administrative assistant to build your credibility. You’ll need a high school education, good communication skills, impeccable organization and access to the internet. Check online job boards for virtual assistant listings to get started.

  19. Web Developer
  20. Average annual salary: $69,000

    Web developers make webpages visually appealing and user-friendly while keeping them running smoothly. Developers possess a unique mix of graphic design and technical programming skills, including expert knowledge of coding, creating interactive features like animations, and designing for secure online payments.

    How to get started. You’ll need an associate degree to advance in this field. While specialized certifications aren’t necessary, you must be skilled at coding languages and web design. The workday generally follows a typical business schedule, though you’ll have to be available if the site crashes or your client needs an urgent update.

10 Ideal Work-from-Home Jobs for Parents

Being a parent is a full-time job. You’re cooking, cleaning, running the kids to and from practices, and managing everyone’s appointments. But if you’re looking for a way to earn a little cash, here’s a list of legitimate jobs that busy parents can do from home full-time, part-time, or possibly even as a side hustle.

  1. Customer Service Representative
  2. Average annual salary: $33,000

  3. Data Entry Specialist
  4. Average annual salary: $33,000

  5. Graphic Designer
  6. Average annual salary: $45,000

  7. Medical Records Technician
  8. Average annual salary: $31,000

  9. Medical Transcriptionist
  10. Average annual salary: $46,000

  11. Proofreader
  12. Average annual salary: $45,000

  13. Social Media Manager
  14. Average annual salary: $54,000

  15. Translator
  16. Average annual salary: $60,000

  17. Travel Agent
  18. Average annual salary: $36,000

  19. Writer
  20. Average annual salary: $62,000

9 High-Paying Jobs You Can Do from Home

Experienced workers who want to pursue a high-paying career don’t necessarily need to head into the office. With the right mix of skills and expertise, you can find work-from-home and online jobs that pay very well.

  1. Actuary
  2. Average annual salary: $116,000

    Related job titles: accountant, insurance underwriter, economist, cost estimator, statistician

  3. Business Development Manager
  4. Average annual salary: $64,000

    Related job titles: territory manager, sales manager, regional sales manager, account director

  5. Computer Systems Analyst
  6. Average annual salary: $66,000

    Related job titles: IT specialist, senior systems analyst, network administrator, network architect

  7. Major Gifts Officer
  8. Average annual salary: $88,000

    Related job titles: development director, fundraising director, planned giving officer, director of development, major gift fundraising manager

  9. Public Relations Manager
  10. Average annual salary: $71,000

    Related job titles: public relations director, communications director, pr manager, marketing communications manager

  11. Research Scientist
  12. Average annual salary: $79,000

    Related job titles: computational biologist, molecular biologist, scientist

  13. Senior Medical Writer
  14. Average annual salary: $92,000

    Related job titles: technical writer, principal medical writer, medical editor, regulatory medical writer

  15. Senior Software Engineer
  16. Average annual salary: $113,000

    Related job titles: software developer, software developer (full stack), senior network engineer

  17. UX Designer
  18. Average annual salary: $94,000

    Related job titles: UI designer, UX product designer, UX design manager

10 Work-from-Home Jobs that Don’t Require a College Degree

If you want to work from home but don’t have a college degree, check out this list.

  1. Blogger
  2. Average annual salary: $41,000

    Job description: Write inspiring content that attracts readers for your own blog (or as a guest blogger).

    Skills needed: writing and grammar, organization, tenacity, research, web and social media

  3. Childcare Provider
  4. Average annual salary: $22,000

    Job description: Care and activities for children while parents are away.

    Skills needed: patience, love of children, creativity, organization

  5. Crafter
  6. Average annual salary: $30,000

    Job description: Make crafts and sell them via online shops

    Skills needed: creativity, web savvy, internet access

  7. Customer Service Representative
  8. Average annual salary: $33,000

    Job description: Answer customer questions, resolve or assist with complaints, help with customer billing inquiries, and handle refunds and exchanges.

    Skills needed: verbal communication, conflict resolution, decision-making, positive attitude

  9. Data Entry Specialist
  10. Average annual salary: $33,000

    Job description: Type and submit data by computer quickly and accurately.

    Skills needed: organization, dedication, computer typing, accuracy

  11. Fitness Coach
  12. Average annual salary: $44,000

    Job description: Inspire clients to reach fitness goals online.

    Skills needed: love of fitness, drive for success, ability to use social media and web platforms

  13. Medical Coder
  14. Average annual salary: $42,000

    Job description: Review and analyze medical records to accurately assign billing codes.

    Skills needed: attention to detail, knowledge of coding and compliance guidelines, may require specialized certifications

  15. Payroll Support Specialist
  16. Average annual salary: $44,000

    Job description: Process payroll, follow balancing procedures to ensure accuracy, and ensure compliance with government regulations.

    Skills needed: knowledge of payroll software, basic accounting abilities, data entry

  17. Telemarketer
  18. Average annual salary: $28,000

    Job description: Call prospective clients to sell products or services.

    Skills needed: tenacity, excellent communication, negotiation

  19. Virtual Assistant
  20. Average annual salary: $39,000

    Job description: Manage emails, arrange meetings, help with event management, assist with social media, and perform administrative tasks.

    Skills needed: verbal and written communication, internet access, attention to detail

How to Find Legitimate Work-From-Home Opportunities

There are so many work-from-home opportunities out there that it can be hard to know which ones are the real deal. One good way to weed out work-from-home scams is by remembering the saying, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” Does the job description seem vague, offer high pay for little work, or ask you to pay the employer anything? Just use your common sense to guide your judgment.

Are you ready to follow your work-from-home dreams? No matter which path you choose, you can make it happen — the main thing is to stick with it. Check out our tips for setting up your own home office. Plus, browse our Career Growth Resources to find professional development advice.

This article is for informational purposes only and based on information that is widely available. This information does not, and is not intended to, constitute legal or financial advice. You should contact a professional for advice specific to your situation.

*National average as of December 2022; ziprecruiter.com (Opens in a new tab)

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