D-S2-KPF-Car-hail-article-1263424912

Does Insurance Cover Hail Damage to Autos?

Updated January 3, 2020 . AmFam Team

Hail storms are unpredictable, but your insurance shouldn’t be. Learn if your insurance covers car hail damage and how to file an insurance claim for your car.

Severe weather can take its toll on your car, and when hail strikes you may be wondering what to do next. We’re here to help clear up the confusion and give you confidence that the things you worry about can be covered by your insurance.

The good news is that, if your auto policy includes comprehensive coverage, your insurance company will likely cover the cost to repair damages to your car from hail. Comprehensive coverage can even help you if your car’s declared a total loss due to hail.


Let’s take a closer look at how insurance can help you prepare for unexpected hail damage.

What Insurance Covers Hail Damage to a Car?

Coverage for hail damage is easy with American Family Insurance. By choosing to add comprehensive coverage, your policy can handle each of the various stages of hail damage. And you’ll get the focused protection you need to get you on the road to recovery quickly. Like car accidents, the amount of hail damage can vary from one car to the next. That’s why we recommend several coverages to best protect you from costly out-of-pocket hail damage repairs.

Comprehensive coverage

Is hail damage covered in a standard car insurance policy? Not usually. So, what insurance covers hail damage to cars? As the name suggests comprehensive coverage covers a lot, including hail damage.

With it, you’ll have coverage from falling objects like hail events or tree branches that damage your car. It’s called comprehensive because it covers your car in a number of important ways that aren’t included in a standard auto policy:

  • Theft
  • Collisions with birds or animals
  • Vandalism
  • Fires or explosions
  • Hail or natural disasters
  • Certain falling objects
  • Floods

Gap/lease & loan coverage

This important coverage is something you may already have on your car, especially if you still owe money on it. Many financing agreements require this coverage to help reconcile costs in the event of a covered total loss.

Here’s how it works: when your car’s declared a total loss, your insurance company will pay out its actual cash value. But some payment plans don’t pay off the car as quickly as it’s depreciating. That can result in you owing more on your car than it’s worth. And gap/lease & loan coverage can help pay for that difference after a major hailstorm.

Rental car reimbursement

Whether your car suffered minor dings from hail or major dents, rental car reimbursement coverage can come to the rescue after a storm. It’s designed to help cover the costs for renting a car after a covered loss. It’s coverage that can help you for a period of days when your car’s in the shop.

And if it’s been totaled, you’ll have time to shop around and keep your life on track between vehicles. It can also help to cover other transportation-related expenses too:

  • Rental car costs
  • Ride share services
  • Taxis
  • City busses
  • Light rail
  • Commuter trains

What Happens If Your Car Gets Hail Damage?

After a hail storm, car insurance is key. But it’s even more important to pick up comprehensive insurance when you’re selecting coverage. After a hail event, it’s time to act quickly. Here are a few steps to take to evaluate the extent of hail damage done to your car and get your life back to normal quickly:

Assess the damage. Sometimes hairline cracks can appear in the windows, but they can be hard to see. Most hail damage that prevents you from driving has to do with windows being destroyed or shattered. So, look carefully at your windshield.

Make a determination. If there’s damage to your car that prevents it from being driven, get in touch with your insurance agent and get it towed to a qualified repair shop. If it’s drivable, proceed carefully after talking to your agent about next steps.

File a claim. By filing your claim quickly, you’ll do what you can to minimize the down-time between getting your car to the shop and getting it back.

Steps to Claiming Insurance and Filing a Claim for Hail Damage on Cars

After a hail event, the first thing you’ll need to do is get in touch with your insurance agency. Filing a claim is easy with American Family Insurance.

One of the best ways to report a claim is to log into My Account (Opens in a new tab) or use the MyAmFam app. And by initiating your claim with one of these options, you’ll also experience additional benefits including:

  • Filing anywhere, any time
  • Tracking the status of your claim
  • Easily communicating with your claims representative by email or phone

You can always call us at 1-800-MYAMFAM (1-800-692-6326) (Opens in a new tab) to speak directly with a claims representative or contact your American Family Insurance agent (Opens in a new tab).

How Much Does it Cost to Repair Hail Damage to a Car?

Costs to repair hail damage are usually priced out on a per-dent basis. In most cases, you can expect to pay $30-$40 per impact for small or minute dents. Larger dents can be a bigger challenge for hail specialists and can boost that price anywhere from $50-$100+ per dent.

Do I Have to Pay a Deductible for Hail Damage to My Car?

Yes. You’ll need to pay your comprehensive coverage deductible at the time your car goes into the shop. In some cases, your insurance company will subtract the amount of your deductible from the total due and pay that directly to the repair shop. Get in touch with your agent to learn about hail coverage and how your insurance group handles deductibles.

Can I Claim Hail Damage on My Car Twice?

If you own your car outright, you may decide to not get your car repaired after a hail storm. That choice is yours to make. Insurance claims on a hail-damaged car should probably be a priority, even if you own your car. But you should be aware that if your car gets hit by hail again and you decide to then get it repaired, your insurance company may likely deny your claim.

Can You Insure a Car With Hail Damage?

When your car’s been pummeled by hail, these dents can do a lot of aesthetic damage to the car. It’s resale value can quickly decline if you don’t get it repaired. If you’re looking for comprehensive coverage on a car that’s been dinged up and dented from hail, you may not be able to find coverage.

Insurance companies may reject your car because prior damage can be hard to distinguish from new damage. When physical damage happens to your car, it’s best to get it repaired quickly so that your car can continue to benefit from being insurable.

How to Save Your Car From Hail Damage

To put it simply: prevention is all about protection. If you safely can get your car out of harm’s way before the weather turns, do so. Here are some suggestions to help you get ahead of the hail and help keep your car safe:

Download a weather app. User-friendly apps that reference multiple weather sources are key for getting the forecast right and can make a big difference when the wind begins to howl. Consider apps like Dark Sky and Carrot Weather for early warning and real-time radar.

Have a plan. When you know that severe weather is on the horizon, take a few minutes and plan for cover before you need it. Find a space to store your car under shelter or in a garage to minimize or avoid damage altogether.

Get Hail Damage Coverage Before the Storm

If you want more information on how to file a storm-related claim on your car insurance, check with your American Family Insurance agent (Opens in a new tab). And look into comprehensive, gap/lease & loan and rental car reimbursement coverage. By staying ahead of storm season and updating your auto insurance policies before the weather turns, you’ll have great coverage and the comfort that comes with it.

Related Articles

  • Couple signing a contract for a new car while a salesperson holds the clipboard.
    Couple signing a contract for a new car while a salesperson holds the clipboard.
    Do You Need Insurance to Test Drive a Car?

    So, you’re headed to the car dealership to find a new set of wheels — how exciting! You’ve done your research and have a few cars in mind, but you want to make sure your new ride has a good fit and feel. Which means getting behind the wheel for a quick test drive.

    Before you jump into the driver’s seat of that flashy four-wheeled whip, make sure you’re covering your bases: do you need insurance to test drive a car or does the dealership have you covered? Let’s find out.

    Family of three sitting in front of their new car while the salesperson holds the contract.

    Test Driving a Car at the Dealership

    If you’re at the dealership looking to test drive some cars, you’ll want to ensure you’re covered by insurance if anything unexpected were to happen on the road. Here’s what you need to know:

    Two people sitting at a desk discussing documents.

    What if I don’t have car insurance?

    The dealership is required by law to insure their cars, which means they should have a blanket policy that pays for damage if a customer is driving the vehicle. So, whether you personally have car insurance or not, the dealer’s insurance should be considered the primary coverage in the event you need to file a claim.

    Couple buying a new car from a salesperson at a dealership.

    What if I have my own car insurance?

    Same answer as above — if you’re test-driving a car, it’s typically the dealership’s responsibility to cover any damages. However, having your own car insurance is always a good idea because there are some instances a dealership could hold you liable (you’ll find out more on that below).

    A good rule of thumb to follow is that the insurance policy usually stays with the car. So, for most states, your personal auto insurance covers your vehicle, and a dealership’s car is covered by their insurance policy — meaning if you get into an accident while test-driving a car at the dealership, it’ll most likely be covered by their insurance.

    Insurance adjuster reviewing car accident damages.

    Can the dealer hold me liable for damages?

    All of that being said, while you may be covered under a dealership’s insurance, it doesn’t mean you’ll always get off the hook. Depending on the cause of the accident (reckless driving for example) the dealer might hold you liable for damages. While the dealership may initially pay to repair the car, they could subrogate and try to collect from you or your insurer if you caused an accident during the test drive.

    Salesperson at car dealership reviewing a document.

    What if I sign a waiver?

    There are some dealerships who will ask that you sign a “loaner/demo” agreement before handing over the keys for a test drive. This usually happens when you’ll be driving for an extended time or if the salesperson isn’t present on the test drive. Signing the waiver means you’re accepting liability to pay for the cost of repairs if you cause damage to the vehicle during the test drive.

    Of course, be sure to check with your agent to verify that your personal car insurance policy will cover you in instances like this.

    Man test driving a used car from a private owner.

    What if I’m test-driving a car for sale by a private party?

    Though cars that are sold on the private market are typically covered by standard personal auto insurance, the best thing to do to protect yourself is ask them to call their agent and ensure you’re covered to drive the car.

    You could also ask the owner of the vehicle to sign a statement that gives you permission to drive the car and stating the car is insured. It never hurts to be extra careful in instances like these.

    Keep in mind, if you’re planning on test-driving a car, insurance coverage may be different for each dealership or private party selling the vehicle. Always make sure to discuss with the salesman if you’re covered by their insurance if you were to get into an accident. You can also check with your insurance agent if you’re unsure or have any questions.

    Couple at a car dealership, holding up a set of keys.

    What do I need to test-drive a car?

    Requirements to test drive a car may vary by dealership and state, but typically you’ll just need to have a valid driver’s license on hand to take it for a spin.

    Our advice to avoid any insurance issues? Be mindful that you’re handling the vehicle with extra care and caution. Familiarize yourself with the vehicle before shifting into gear, set your mirrors to your liking, make sure your feet reach the pedals comfortably, give other cars plenty of space, and, as fun as it is to crank the music, don’t mess with the radio this time around.

    Planning on bringing a car home for good? Here’s a helpful list of what to bring when buying a car — it’s everything you need to make the car buying process smoother.

    Keep in mind, searching for a car is a process that shouldn’t be rushed. Make sure you get out on the road and properly test drive a handful of options. You can also head into the dealership fully prepared with our six tips to make car buying better.

    After you’ve signed the dotted lines and the keys are yours, connect with an American Family Insurance agent to check out our auto coverages to make sure your new ride never goes unprotected.

  • American Family Insurance - person holding phone to call someone after an accident.
    What Happens When a Car is Totaled?

    If you’ve been in an accident and your car takes a serious beating, it may be deemed “totaled” by your insurance company. But what does it actually mean if your car is totaled, and what do you do about it?

    Because you need the right insurance in place before you hit the road, we’re going to review important additional protections that really can make a big difference — like rental car reimbursement coverage. With it, when you’re wondering “is my car totaled?” after an accident, you’ll have some peace of mind knowing you can rent a car and get where you’re going.

    The two types of insurance coverage you’ll want on your car insurance policy — to ensure your vehicle damage is insured — are collision and comprehensive coverage.

    Here’s a detailed breakdown of when a car is considered totaled and what to do if your car is totaled, to help you get back on the road and keep your dreams moving forward.

  • Siblings in the back seat of a car sleeping
    siblings in the back seat of a car sleeping
    Road Trip Essentials & Checklist

    You work hard at your job to provide for your family, and you save up your vacation time so you can hit the road with them. There’s nothing better than exploring the world together and making great memories . But the pre-vacation excitement can quickly fade if you haven’t prepared properly.

    That’s why we’ve come up with some tips to make your car trip as fun and memorable as the sightseeing itself. Read along, learn what essentials to pack for your summer road trip and be ready for the road ahead!

  • A woman driving a car safely and avoiding distracted driving.
    Woman driving car safely and avoiding distracted driving.
    How to Prevent Distracted Driving

    Sending a text, eating your burrito, applying makeup — what do all of these tasks have in common?

    They’re all everyday examples of distracted driving.

    As a driver, it’s your responsibility to focus on the road to keep you, your passengers, and other people on the road safe from accidents. We’ve put a spotlight on some risky driving behaviors that we hope can help influence you to keep your focus on the road.

    What is Distracted Driving?

    Distracted driving is when the driver is doing something that takes their attention away from the task of driving. Any time your eyes and/or mind are taken away from the road, you’re technically distracted, which means an increase in the risk of an accident.

    Not all driving distractions are created equal. As you can imagine, some forms of distraction aren’t as dangerous as others. For example, hands-free telephone conversations — although not recommended — isn’t as deadly as other modes of conversation while driving.

    The Deadliest Driving Distraction: Texting and Driving

    It should come as no surprise to you that texting is the most common distraction while driving as well as the most dangerous. It’s so deadly in fact, that it gets its very own section.

    It’s easy for us all to see the dangers of texting while driving, but even with that knowledge, so many of us fall into the temptation of sending off a fast text message while behind the wheel. But even a quick text can have horrible consequences.

    Just think, when you look at your phone, your focus is on the screen, not the road; one hand is off the wheel to hold your device, and your mind drifts to the message instead of the task at hand: driving safely.

    Why texting is distracting

    To put it into perspective, if you’re traveling at 55 MPH and you take your eyes off the road and onto your phone, you’ve traveled about 100 yards – the length of a football field! That’s quite a distance to cover driving “blind.”

    The National Safety Council reports that one out of every four car accidents in the United States is caused by a distracted driver who was texting. They also reported that texting and driving is six times more likely to cause an accident than driving while intoxicated.

    Let these driving facts be a wake-up call to the extreme dangers of texting while driving.

    Is it Illegal to Use Your Phone While Driving?

    The truth is that it depends on which state you live in. As of 2020, the Governors Highway Safety Association reports that there is a hand-held cell phone use ban in 22 states, with 48 states banning text messaging for all drivers. Find out the distracted driving laws for your state to ensure you’re following the rules of the road in your state.

    It’s always important to know our state laws, and in your state there may very well be no law preventing you from texting while driving. However, for your safety as well as those in your car, and for anyone else sharing the roads with you, it’s best to stick with a firm “no phone use while driving” mentality.

    Types of Distracted Driving

    The first step to preventing distracted driving is understanding what it is. In a nutshell, anything that occupies your attention while driving is a distraction. Here are a few notable distractors that should be eliminated while behind the wheel.

    Checking your GPS

    When it comes to directions, we’ve come a long way from the world of fold-up maps. Today, everyone has a built-in navigation system in the palm of their hands: the smartphone. The only problem is that just one quick glance at your phone’s screen is all it takes for a costly mistake behind the wheel.

    Your best bet is to leave your phone in your pocket or purse when driving. But if you must use your phone for directions, enable the voice feature so that you don’t have to look at the screen for every turn.

    Sifting through your music device

    Trying to find the right song for your road trip is just as dangerous as texting and driving. Your best bet is to pick a playlist prior to getting into your vehicle. Or listen to the radio. The key here is to keep your eyes on the road and not on your music device.

    Checking social media

    Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, you name it – all of them bide for our constant attention. Don’t fall prey to this when you’re driving. That post, tweet, or message can wait. Avoid checking social media when behind the wheel.

    Eating behind the wheel

    You may be a pro at eating your burrito on the go, but ingesting your lunch while driving is a big no-no. All it takes is one wayward waffle fry to take your attention from the road to your lap. And it’s not just the mess that distracts; it’s the smell, taste, you name it – that makes eating one of the most distracting things you can do while driving.

    Other types of distracted driving

    There are a few more forms of distracted driving that could cause an accident. If you’re in the driver’s seat, try to avoid these altogether:

    • Taking selfies
    • Talking on the phone
    • Drinking coffee or another beverage
    • Putting on makeup
    • Using an app
    • Loud music

    Top 5 Ways to Prevent Distracted Driving

    There are easy ways to prevent distracted driving. Try using making these five simple changes distracted driving safety tips to have a safer driving experience.

    Use a text-blocking app

    There are many apps available that block texts while driving. Several apps exist with different features, ranging from ones that completely block any incoming or outgoing texts while going a certain speed, to apps that will send a message saying you’re unavailable to respond to an incoming text. Here’s a list from DMV.org with great suggestions for apps to fight distracted driving.

    Have a passenger navigate for you

    If you’re driving with a passenger (of an appropriate age), hand the directions to them. Even a not-so-great navigator in the passenger seat is better than the person behind the wheel being responsible for both driving and navigating. If you’re driving by yourself, take the time to look at the directions before you set off. Then turn the volume up and let the AI lead the way.

    Make music selection easy

    Make multiple playlists that you can choose from before starting the car. If you really need to change it up, either pull over or wait for a red light. Set your presets to stations you already know you like. Hitting one button is better than cranking the dial until you find music you like.

    Don’t text while driving

    If you’re behind the wheel, just put the phone away. Social media can wait. It’s not going anywhere — that we can promise. Are the notifications too tempting? Turn them off! No comment or new tweet is worth the risk.

    Eat at home or while stopped

    If you’re in a rush and want to keep things moving, consider the hazards of driving while eating behind the wheel. Hopefully you can recognize that the risks outweigh the temptation, and you can wait until you get to your destination to eat.

     

    How Does Distracted Driving Affect Insurance?

    For starters, getting into an at-fault accident will almost always make your insurance premium go up, simply because your insurance company now deems you a higher-risk driver. Distracted driving is no exception. Even if you avoid an accident but you get a ticket for distracted driving, you’re susceptible to those increases in insurance.

    Why does distracted driving increase insurance? For starters, you may be getting a discount for having a clean driving record. But if you get a ticket, such as for texting while driving, you may no longer be eligible for that discount, and you’ll notice an increase in your premium. Another reason your insurance might go up goes back to being a higher risk. If you’re guilty of distracted driving, an insurance company will consider you a high-risk driver (meaning you’re more likely to file a claim due to an accident) and they’ll set your premiums higher.

    Many of the discounts that insurance companies give out revolve around rewarding drivers for having no claims and a good driving record in general. Don’t let distracted driving take away those perks!

    Protect Yourself From Distracted Drivers on the Road

    Avoiding distracting driving behaviors is a great way to be safe on the road, and car insurance is a great way to stay protected from the unexpected. With American Family you can customize your car coverage to meet your unique needs. Talk to your agent today to find the right coverage for you.

    The Insurance Information Institute claims driving while interacting with a mobile device can increase the odds of a crash by as much as 3.5 times, compared to the risks that a sober, alert and attentive driver faces. Teens are more susceptible to collisions, even when speaking hands-free on a mobile phone. Let’s explore the many ways you can help prevent distracted driving accidents.